Courses We Offer

The following courses are offered through Lower Division Studies. Included here are brief descriptions of these courses and their objectives.
Index: English 1101, English 1102, English 1103, English 2110, English 2120, English 2130

English 1101: English Composition I

Catalog Course Description
This course is designed to increase the student’s ability to construct written prose of various kinds. It focuses on methods of organization, analysis, research skills, and the production of short expository essays; readings consider issues of contemporary social and cultural concern. A passing grade is C.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course, students will be able to

  • engage in writing as a process, including various invention heuristics (brainstorming, for example), gathering evidence, considering audience, drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading, engage in the collaborative, social aspects of writing, and use writing as a tool for learning,
  • use language to explore and analyze contemporary multicultural, global, and international questions,
  • demonstrate how to use writing aids, such as handbooks, dictionaries, online aids, and tutors,
  • gather, summarize, synthesize, and explain information from various sources,
  • use grammatical, stylistic, and mechanical formats and conventions appropriate for a variety of audiences,
  • critique their own and others’ work in written and oral formats,
  • produce coherent, organized, readable prose for a variety of rhetorical situations reflect on what contributed to their writing process and evaluate their own work.

Previous Sections
Instructors in English 1101 tend to emphasize expository writing, the writing process, short essays drawn from a few sources, and an introduction to rhetorical strategies. Most English 1101 sections focus on an introduction to college writing; however, we must remember that students come to us with varied experience and skills. Some sections have focused not on academic writing but civic writing and service learning, ethnographic description, or personal essays. Most tend to take a rhetorical approach to this course, encouraging students to write with rhetorical strategies in mind (purpose, logos, ethos, pathos, arrangement, patterns, audience awareness, situated writing, etc). Some sections are part of Freshman Learning Communities, groups of students who take the same courses, based on an area of interest. Thus, they’ll have a theme, and you’ll relate assignments to the other courses. But the primary goal for this course is clear, logical writing, within a specified context or situation, and with a specific audience in mind.

In 1101, we want students to think about writing as a motivated, purposeful activity, and we try to develop assignments to meet that goal. We also introduce students to research activities, the library, the Internet, computer-based writing, and other means of communication. And of course, we intend for them to review (and if necessary, learn) the conventions of academic writing, including what some of us call grammar and Standard English but also developing paragraphs and effective topic sentences, using transitions and reader-friendly prose, summarizing sources, drawing conclusions from sources, and synthesizing sources effectively. Assignments for writing cover a variety of writing types and purposes, some narrative, some expository, some argument.

English 1102: English Composition II

Catalog Course Description
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in English 1101. This course is designed to develop writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by English 1101. It stresses critical reading and writing and incorporates several research methods; readings will be drawn from a wide variety of texts. A passing grade is C.

Learning Outcomes
In addition to the skills acquired in English 1101, by the end of the course, students will be able to

  • analyze, evaluate, document, and draw inferences from various sources,
  • identify, select, and analyze appropriate research methods, research questions, and evidence for a specific rhetorical situation,
  • use argumentative strategies and genres in order to engage various audiences,
  • integrate others’ ideas with their own,
  • use grammatical, stylistic, and mechanical formats and conventions appropriate to rhetorical situations and audience constraints,
  • produce well reasoned, argumentative essays demonstrating rhetorical engagement, and reflect on what contributed to their writing process and evaluate their own work.

Previous Sections
Previous sections of English 1102 have focused in more depth on argumentative writing, from civic writing and political arguments to literary response and essays. Instructors have introduced students to the study of argument and rhetorical theories by using texts that either, 1) focus on rhetorical theory, types of argument, and a variety of nonfiction essays, or 2) teach students to create arguments about topics that draw from literature, or both.

In 1102, we want students to try out a variety of arguments that draw on different types of sources as evidence. Although we have introduced them to research and library work in English 1101, we offer additional research instruction and guidance for particular assignments. English 1102 offers more practice writing from sources, including summary and paraphrase, quoting and citing sources, evaluating and drawing conclusions from sources, synthesizing sources, and other techniques for researched writing. Students learn more sophisticated argumentative strategies, including developing appeals to fact or reason, values, character, and emotion; building credibility; developing effective reasons; using appropriate evidence; and analyzing and developing various types of argument.

We also find that students continue to need help with academic usage and structures. However, English 1102 offers more attention to style and usage as rhetorical strategies. Rhetorical strategies covered in English 1101 become practical considerations for English 1102.

English 1103: Advanced Composition

Catalog Course Description
English 1103 (3) Prerequisite: admission by permission of department or Honors Program. A passing grade is C. This course is designed to develop students’ ability to construct written texts on a sophisticated level. It emphasizes critical reading and writing of various sources and incorporates advanced research methods. In addition, it emphasizes more advanced rhetorical issues, including invention strategies, arrangement, selecting and analyzing evidence, and developing appropriate style.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course, students will be able to

  • understand and engage in writing as a process, including various invention heuristics, gathering evidence, drafting, revising, editing, and proof-reading,
  • understand the collaborative, social aspects of writing, including the ability to use writing as a tool for learning,
  • analyze, evaluate and draw inferences from information from various sources,
  • identify, select, and analyze and appropriate research methods, research question, and evidence for a specific rhetorical situation,
  • use grammatical, stylistic, and mechanical formats and conventions appropriate to various rhetorical situations,
  • integrate others’ ideas with their own, and produce well-reasoned, logical argumentative essays with evidence appropriate to the rhetorical situation.

Previous Sections
English 1103 is offered to students who have exempted English1101 and 1102, and who are placed in this course through testing, SAT scores, or AP scores. English 1103H is an honors course for Honors Students only and functions as a Freshman Learning Community. The content of the course is not different from English 1103, however, unless the Honors freshman community has a specific theme attached to it. This advanced composition course assumes reading and writing skill on the part of the students.

English 2110: World Literature

Course Description
The World Literature survey (ENGL 2110) provides an overview of world literatures (as opposed to surveying a single national literature, such as American or British). Thus, the course includes writing from India, Asia, South America, and other parts of the world as well. 2110 provides an option for fulfilling the university core humanities requirement, but is not a required course for English majors. Still, many English majors take the class in order to fulfill the humanities requirement, as 2120 and 2130 cannot be used by an English major in that capacity.

General Outcomes

  • identify and explain the fundamental features of the genres of poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and drama
  • define key literary terms/concepts and implement these in oral/written discussion as well as in literary interpretation describe, examine, and evaluate their own reading practices and oral/written critical analyses
  • analyze literature and explain how various components of literature work together to create meaning
  • apply writing and revision as tools for understanding literature and its interpretation

Specific Outcomes

  • differentiate between Western and non-Western literature
  • recognize, describe, and analyze the influence of various cultures in literary works

English 2120: British Literature

Course Description
The British Literature survey (ENGL 2120) provides both a historical survey and an overview of literatures from the British Isles. 2120 is both an option for fulfilling the university core humanities requirement and a required course for all English majors.

General Outcomes

  • identify and explain the fundamental features of the genres of poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and drama
  • define key literary terms/concepts and implement these in oral/written discussion as well as in literary interpretation
  • describe, examine, and evaluate their own reading practices and oral/written critical analyses
  • analyze literature and explain how various components of literature work together to create meaning.
  • apply writing and revision as tools for understanding literature and its interpretation

Specific Outcomes

  • recognize and describe British literary history as chronological, developmental (moving through time periods), and generic/thematic
  • recognize and interpret relationships between British literature and its literary history and culture

English 2130: American Literature

Course Description
The American Literature survey (ENGL 2130) provides both a historical survey and an overview of literatures of the United States. 2130 is both an option for fulfilling the university core humanities requirement and a required course for all English majors.

General Outcomes

  • identify and explain the fundamental features of the genres of poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and drama
  • define key literary terms/concepts and implement these in oral/written discussion as well as in literary interpretation
  • describe, examine, and evaluate their own reading practices and oral/written critical analyses
  • analyze literature and explain how various components of literature work together to create meaning.
  • apply writing and revision as tools for understanding literature and its interpretation

Specific Outcomes

  • recognize and describe American literary history as chronological, developmental (moving through time periods), and generic/thematic
  • recognize and interpret relationships between American literature and its literary history and culture